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Do you remember the old Saint Louis adage, “If you don’t like the weather, stick around… it will be different tomorrow”? Those words couldn’t ring truer than during the winter months. As temperatures begin to drop, there is no better time than now to start preparing your pavement for the impending winter weather.

The winter months—if not properly prepared for—can wreak havoc on your pavement. Did you know that there are ways to save your pavement from Jack Frost’s bite? Here are a few trusty tips to keep in mind:

Marking Curbs for Snow Plows: Curbs can be replaced when damaged; however, the cost of these repairs can be in the thousands. Snow plow markers, which can be purchased at most local hardware stores, offer an effective, cost-efficient alternative to repairing your curb. The way they work is quite simple: place the markers at the corners of all islands, creating continuous visibility for the snow plow drivers. In fact, placement of these markers can be written into your snow removal contract.

Crack Filling: This is one of the most important actions to preserve aging asphalt surfaces. As cracks form in asphalt it allows water to penetrate the surface. Water penetration to the base and subgrade can cause extensive failure, resulting in expensive patching. During the winter months the freeze-thaw cycle accelerates the damages. A good crack maintenance program is essential to prevent these repairs. We recommend using crack fill on straight line cracks because the base is still relatively solid.

Potholes: Normal wear and tear, along with exposure to the winter elements, allows water to penetrate the base. As we mentioned earlier, when this happens the base will begin to fail, resulting in the birth of a pothole. Once the base is damaged and concentrated cracking occurs, crack filling is no longer an option. There are many options for pothole repair, please contact us for a consultation.

Stay Safe: Loose asphalt can present a slew of challenges for both pedestrians and drivers. Through regular maintenance, you can reduce the risk of falls, twisted ankles, damaged tires/suspension systems and any number of risks that come with a damaged parking lot.

If you would like to talk with us about project planning for 2013, please feel free to contact Leritz & Busy Bee via email or by phone at 314-568-9863.

Even the most well-designed asphalt pavement system can’t escape the damaging effects of Mother Nature. How can facility owners or building managers know which preventative maintenance strategies are best for them?
In relatively new pavement showing the beginning signs of deficiencies such as surface cracking, preventative maintenance can add years to the life of an asphalt pavement system. Planning a pavement maintenance program early on can save both time and money.
Here are some helpful processes for maintaining your commercial asphalt system:
Crackfilling – Crackfilling typically refers to the process of blowing out and cleaning cracks prior to installation of a crackfiller material. This is also known as the “blow-and-go” method. If properly done, crackfilling reduces the infiltration of water into the crack, which protects the pavement system from being weakened by moisture. Crackfilling should be used for wider-type, non-working cracks.
Cracksealing – The cracksealing process involves an additional step that’s highly recommended for longer-term performance, and involves routing of the crack. Cracksealing includes grinding out the crack to a wider, 0.5-inch by 0.5-inch to 0.75-inch by 0.75-inch square, providing a reservoir for the rubberized crackseal material.
Surface Treatments – There are many surface-treatment options to choose from. General categories of surface treatments include: coatings (asphalt or coal tar emulsions), penetrating or rejuvenating sealers or aggreagate-based seals such as slurry seals, chip seals and micro-surfacing.
Be sure to call Leritz / Busy Bee to inquire if any of these practices will work for your commercial pavement system!
Source: Buildings.com, full article at www.buildings.com/ArticleDetails/tabid/3321/ArticleID/6701/Default.aspx